Up to 65 Menifee Teachers To Be Let Go?

I received some information that needs to be shared with the community. This info comes from an MTA union meeting that occurred a few we...

I received some information that needs to be shared with the community. This info comes from an MTA union meeting that occurred a few weeks ago. It appears that the new budget is going to bring a lot of new changes for Menifee schools next year and all of our children will be negatively affected.


The information below was emailed to my wife by an "insider"-


"One of the main things the district is focusing on to save money is doing away with class size reduction, meaning that ALL grade levels could have 30-35+ students in a classroom next year. If they decide to do this, they will be cutting the last 65 teachers hired, anyone after June 2006.

Since Southshore elementary is the newest school in Menifee, this will include almost all of the upper grade teachers, since most were all hired within the last 2-3 years. Many other schools in the district will also be affected.

Tuesday, Feb. 17th, there is going to be a public hearing/board meeting at Quail Valley Elementary at 6:00 pm.


The district is encouraging teachers, parents, and community members to attend and share their thoughts and opinions about schools for next year. The budget has not been decided but most likely cuts will come from teachers in order to save money.


The district would like to hear from the community and parents. All parents of
Menifee children should attend!"


There is information about the district budget updates on the district website. If you would like to send a comment to the Menifee Union School District Budget Advisory Committee, click here to email them a message.



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  1. I am saddened by the choices that our district is thinking about making. I understand that the budget needs to be cut, but cutting teachers is the WORST choice that the district could make. I would rather have no books, no counselors, no support staff, and no field trips than have my children in classroom with 30-35 students.

    I have taught for 10 years and can tell you first hand that when the class size increases, the learning decreases. It's just simple math. The teacher has to divide time among more kids (and more challenging kids per classroom) so there is less time per child to teach. It is unfair to the students and unfair to the teachers to increase class size.

    I have never been one to complain and not offer my own suggestions for a solution. While I cannot fix the budget, I can offer the parents of Menifee another option where schooling is concerned.

    I am starting a public charter school in MUSD (we are in the petition-writing phase) and because charters are given more freedoms (and less money), my classrooms will only have a 20 to 1 ratio. We will make due with whatever we must in order to keep that ratio. It is THAT important.

    My thoughts are with all staff, students, and parents of MUSD as we face the economic challenges ahead.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Although your intentions are good. Opening up a charter school will only mean that less students will be going to the other public schools. THAT'S THE PROBLEM !!!! The student enrollment is down in many local schools that is another reason why teachers are losing their jobs. Many families left the area due to the economy.
    The community must get involved and attend these meetings. Otherwise, class sizes will increase each year.

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  3. I am a teacher in San Jacinto, and this exact thing happened to our district last year. In fact, I am set to lose my job this year for the same reasons. Despite this, I live in Menifee, and would hate to see the same thing happen here as well. I speak as a teacher and a parent when I say that the decision to cut teachers and raise class sizes will be detrimental to all involved.

    I'd love to speak at the board meeting on Tuesday as a teacher, parent, and community member. Does anybody know how long they give to speak for the public? (our district gives 3 minutes). Also, how long does it typically take for the meeting to start and get to public portion? If anybody has these answers, I'd really appreciate it so I can try and put together something to say and be there in support of our community. Thanks!

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  4. The school teachers aren't the only people being affected by the state's budget problems. The teacher unions are very good at making it look like the schools are being picked on, but all other state-funded organizations are being similarly affected. For example, there will be many Caltrans workers losing their jobs potentially causing our highways to go into disrepair. Many law enforcement agencies are losing funding, potentially making the state's streets more dangerous. City's are at risk of losing their state funding (like their share of the VLF) potentially making our communities more susceptible to the problems that the City of Vallejo is currently going through (bankruptcy).

    I don't think it is a good thing that class sizes may increase. I honestly believe that many school districts in California have too much money being caught up in the administrative layer and that money never makes it to the classroom. Unfortunately the classroom is the easiest place for those administrations to cut. (I don't know whether this is the case or not with MUSD.)

    My point is that the schools get all the media attention, but every state-funded organization is being hit hard and in a similar fashion. It just doesn't make it on the evening news.

    If you really want to make a difference I believe it must happen in Sacramento. Your state legislator and senator have much more say over the funds allocated to school districts, not your local school board.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Just read a news article that 20,000 state employees will get pink slips tomorrow. The teachers won't be alone in the unemployment line.

    ReplyDelete
  6. The mantra of tax cuts by the Republicans have affected all layers of government and our society. As in the Great Depression, there is a need to have governmental intervention to get this country going.

    And gasp, there is a need for a tax increase for our local school district. For the middle and low class, a small increase in taxes will restore many of the programs and positions that are being cut at this time.

    There is also a need to lower the level of approval down to 55% in the State Senate for budgetary items. There are two initiatives being circulated that voters can consider in 2010.

    It is time to take back our government and not let extremists in both parties dominate the political process.

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  7. Students SHOULD come first. Thankfully I can still pay for private school where class size is guaranteed and the kids are number one!

    ReplyDelete
  8. The problem with this state is not revenues it is spending. I cannot sympathize with state employees who feel we should continually raise taxes to increase the size of government. What the state needs to do, is stop spending.

    Where do teachers in California rank, as far as pay, with the rest of the Country? Are we getting our money's worth?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Where do teachers in California rank, as far as pay, with the rest of the Country?

    An American Federation of Teachers report answers your question here:

    http://www.aft.org/salary/2007/download/AFT2007SalarySurvey.pdf

    ReplyDelete
  10. To: Anonymous Anonymous, at February 16, 2009 10:19 PM

    Additional information on the board meeting tonight.

    The meeting is at 6:00 pm and they run approximately 1 1/2 to 2 hours. The public is allowed 3 minutes to address the board. Sometimes if you need more time they will grant you additional minutes.

    If you would like to address the MUSD tonight please fill out a form with the secretary. Which is optional not mandatory.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Raising taxes causes people to STOP spending. The tax cuts by the republicans have nothing to do with this mess. Spending is the problem. Giving loans to people who can't afford them is the problem. The gov't not answering to the people is the problem. The government intervention in the Great Depression did not help. And the government intervention in this depression will not help.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Teachers in CA are paid more than in other states simply because it's so expensive to live here.

    Factor in the cost of living in CA and our teachers are nowhere near the top.

    Don't get caught up in comparing CA education to others. No state faces the scope and scale of the challenges that CA schools are forced to deal with every day.

    ReplyDelete
  13. The only thing that costs more in California than other states is taxes.

    I can buy a house cheaper in North Dakota than I can in California. The average teacher salary there is $35,000.

    Try again.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Dear February 17, 2009 1:33 PM,

    You just proved the point.

    Perhaps you should "Try again".

    ReplyDelete
  15. We can argue all day about how California got into this position. The point is what are we going to do about our educational system. Our kids depend on it.

    Were messing with our kids future and ours as well. If these kids do not learn what is essential when we get old we will have to pay for it. We think the government or economy is bad now wait till our uneducated kids take over.

    ReplyDelete
  16. "I can buy a house cheaper in North Dakota than I can in California. The average teacher salary there is $35,000."

    It should have read, "cheaper in California than in North Dakota". Look it up.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Same goes with Montana.

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  18. The problem is you people keep voting the same idiots into office over and over again. And you keep voting for all these bonds that no one can afford. And you want to pay for every tom, dick and harry to have free lunches and medical care. Wake up people! We can't afford to take care of everyone and keep living off of credit. This is what happens when you vote careless spenders into office.

    ReplyDelete
  19. It's hard on every household, business and entity when economic changes require major budget cuts, but it's a test of character when you watch how leaders make those cuts. Anonymous 9:54 PM is mistaken to think that charter schools are a problem. I understand how ADA money flows, but is the bottom line the student or the district?

    I heard a great analogy the other day about trying to save the titanic after it was ripped open. Is the district trying to save the titanic or the souls on board?

    I personally think the district should try to fight for some independence from the state and federal system of education that's failing across the country, and really think hard over these next few years about what's important to the parents and students of our community. Let's not just wish for a return to the status quo.

    ReplyDelete
  20. California ranks in the upper middle of states when it comes to taxes. Spending is a big issue, but the fact is we have responsibilities that have to be paid for and we don't have the tax revenue. Yes, Californians complain about taxes, always have, and it is part of the reason we are hurting so badly now. It started with Prop 13, continued with the artificially high housing prices, and now all of our desires and needs have come do. Forget the"it is a spending problem, not a tax problem." Wrong. It is both.

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  21. I am not a big fan of some teachers in this district..but I do know that class increase will never go back down..because the State will accept our marginal passing of their assessment test and will never need to reduce classroom size...Don't open that can of worms. I believe that we need to keep class room sizes down and we will all be the better for it. We need more teachers like Dave Sisk who is teacher at Bell Mountain. He cares for the kids and my son is the better for it..He was a 2.8 student entering
    8th grade he graduated on the honor roll and now is a 3.8 Student in High school. Take this time parents to Thank Those teachers that have positively affected you

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  22. Ms Rogers states that charter schools receive less money "(and less money)'. This is another falsehood presented by those that would divert your money to their needs. If the Menifee School District before that start of the 2008/2009 school year had declared all their schools as charter schools, they would have received 1,122,000 more in general fund money. This is because charter school get funding based upon grade levels with K-3 getting the lowest dollars per attendance and grades 9-12 getting the most.

    ReplyDelete
  23. In response to the comment that it is false to state that charters are given less money...let me refer you to some independent research studies that say different.

    The Thomas B. Fordham Institute Research Study titled "Charter School Funding:Inequity's Next Frontier," 2005 states in its findings that:

    "The 49 charter schools in Los Angeles received 29.0 percent less funding than district schools: $5,653 vs. $7,960 per pupil, a difference of $2,307.

    20 charter schools in San Diego charter schools received 40.4 percent less funding than district schools: $4,964 vs. $8,333 per pupil, a difference of $3,369.

    Due to data quality and collection issues in California for 2002-03, an accurate statewide total for charter school revenue could not be determined. Based on the Los Angeles and San Diego data, the authors extrapolated that the 408 charter schools in California received 31.5 percent less revenue than district schools statewide, resulting in a gap of $2,223 compared with district schools statewide.

    The primary reasons for these funding disparities: California charters had a lower participation rate in eight relatively large federal and state categorical programs. Charters did not receive these funds as part of their Categorical Block Grant and were required to apply for them separately. Charter schools do not typically benefit from bonds or other local revenues. However, charters receive funding in lieu of local property taxes as part of the state funding formula."


    The Center for Education Reform Study titled "Solving the Charter School Funding Gap," 2005 states in its findings that:

    "Over the last twelve months,the Center for Education Reform (CER) has conducted extensive research ofstate charter data in 40 states and the District ofColumbia,and analyzed results from surveys ofalmost half of the nation’s 3,400 charter schools operating at the end ofthe 2005 school year. The data revealed that,on average,charter schools receive 21.25 percent less public money than conventional public schools. This number is consistent with the conclusions of the comprehensive report released in August by the Thomas B.Fordham Foundation, “Charter School Funding:Inequity’s Next Frontier”which found a gap of 21.7 percent across 17 states."

    Before you start explaining how charter schools work, check your facts.

    This is not a comment on the "martyrdom" of public charters. Public charter schools have many benefits that their traditional counterparts do not. They are given freedom from many points of bureaucracy, but in comes at a price. Charter schools are expected to show measurable results (which traditional schools try to do, but won't be closed if they don't) and we are given less money to do it with (fact, not falsehood).

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  24. In all the commotion about budget cuts, I find it amazing that the administrators of MUSD are begin very quiet about the fact that they are maintaining extended contracts with salaries based on a 225 day school year. It is understandable that administrators work a few extra days, (although, since they don't see kids, I don't know why), but they could easily go from 225 to 205 and have their paychecks prorated on a per diem basis. This is easy math. Teachers who previously taught on extended contracts were expected to take the salary hit gracefully. It's your turn, administrators.

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  25. When the district went 20:1, we created a majority of lower grade teachers in the district. Ask the middle school teachers how they feel about class sizes. Ask P.E. teachers, choir teachers, band teachers. As someone who remembers when there were 200 applicants for every teaching job, I find it amazing that new teachers starting out not only the assurance of a job for life, but a guarantee that they will never have to teach more than 20 children!

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  26. Anybody know of any good homeschooling groups?

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  27. February 19, 1:16 Your post is very confusing. I am not sure what your point is but if you are saying that middle school teachers do not value CSR then maybe it is because they have been in the district less than 10 years. For those of us who were here before then we remember how difficult it was to teach kids when every classroom seemed like the 1 room schoolhouse, every level from K to the 5th, 7th, or whatever the upper grade was. Unfortunately, we have yet to see the data on the % of students that are grade level in academics 4th-8th as compared to 15 years ago. CSR has made everyones job easier although I imagine in Middle School it is hard to see the benefits when you are blinded by the 34 challenges sitting in front of you. Fortunately, at least 30 of them know the rules of conduct, stay in their seats, can wipe their own noses, do not wet their pants, they raise their hands, and can read what is put in front of them. Although, I am sure that some middle school teachers would disagree...:) We all have our challenges and they change as per grade level but getting the kids up to standards in reading and math when they are younger is reliably done in smaller classes.

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  28. I have my child in a private school and 20, 4 year olds is too many. There is an aide, but the aide does not do much. Private teachers can lack the positive classroom management skills that I see in the public setting. My child comes home saying they all had a consequence because the class was not listening. There seems to be the same level of bad behavior, lots of over-active kids that drain the teachers attention.Most of these kids have grandparents paying the tuition. Pre-school shouldn't have more than 15 per class. Or the aides should have better training. What are the good schools in Menifee?

    ReplyDelete
  29. To Robyn and everyone else that want to compare our public schools to private and charter schools...

    You are missing the largest piece of the puzzle. You keep mentioning that they perform better on less money.

    Charter and private schools do not have the population of "Special Needs" kids that they do in the regular public schools. These students demand great services that cost big big big money!

    Traditional public schools are required by law to facilitate the learning and care of these kids.

    Put that in your equation if you wish to compare. You'll find that cost/performance comparisons between these different types of schools are complete nonsense.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hey heres something Republicans can cheer about. According to the most recent statistics, California now ranks 50th in school funding. Yes, 50th! Mississippi now ranks 1 higher than we do. Maybe people should move out of this state. Teachers can't teach our children effectively when they don't have appropriate funding. Keep arguing about taxes Republicans, while the state crumbles around you.

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  31. Yes. This state is in this much trouble because republicans are complaining about taxes. Please.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I am a father of two kids in the district. I fought in the first golf war and also the conflict in Panama. I have bled for my country, and lost friends along the way. I do understand the need to be compassionate and feel we need to put our best foot forward and lead by example. Times are hard for schools and individual families. We are all making very hard sacrifices. I guess my question is if we took all the kids without a social security number out of the schools and omitted bilingual education would we not be able to make the cuts necessary and still be able to provide the level of education that our kids deserve. Like I said hard choices need to be made and I think American kids should be come first. I would like to apologize if I offended anyone

    Thank you for your time
    Jason

    ReplyDelete
  33. I am a father of two kids in the district. I fought in the first golf war and also the conflict in Panama. I have bled for my country, and lost friends along the way. I do understand the need to be compassionate and feel we need to put our best foot forward and lead by example. Times are hard for schools and individual families. We are all making very hard sacrifices. I guess my question is if we took all the kids without a social security number out of the schools and omitted bilingual education would we not be able to make the cuts necessary and still be able to provide the level of education that our kids deserve. Like I said hard choices need to be made and I think American kids should be come first. I would like to apologize if I offended anyone

    Thank you for your time
    Jason

    ReplyDelete
  34. I completely agree Jason. I'm tired of my kids coming home telling me the new Spanish words they learned that day (because more than half the kids in their class don't speak English).

    ReplyDelete
  35. Also, thank you so much for protecting our country. You, and all the other soldiers both active and inactive, are the true hero's of this country.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Wow, the anonymous poster at 2:43 onTuesday, yes you are part of the problem, because you missed the commenters point. Funding for California schools now ranks 50th. 50th! Below Mississippi, below Kentucky, below Louisiana. Yes the complaining about yaxes is a problem, because Republicans miss the point in general. I wrote to each of my State Representatives with one request: Tell me the social programs, educational programs,etc...that they would publicly identify as programs they believe should be cut. Should be simple considering every Republican in Sacramento claims we have a spending problem, not tax problem. How many responded back? Zero. I repeated my request 3 more times. No response from any. Typical. Republicans have become the party of hyperbole with no ideas, no solutions, no tough decisions. Just soundbites and the same faile Regan era BS. We should be concerned that the 7th largest economy in the world has the lowest education funding in the country. What hope does our society have when the needs of the upper 1%, yet neglect the needs of the other 99%. Great strategy!

    ReplyDelete
  37. Let me clear something up for everyone. You can't remove or kick any illegal out of public schooling. The Supreme Court has already decided that immigration issues, as they relate to education, fall under Federal jurisdiction. Even if we wanted to remove kids without SS#, etc... we couldn't. What you can do is contact your US Congressmen/women and Senators and voice your concerns. The State, school District, etc... can do nothing. Hands are tied. But also remember, we are talking about children here. Educating any child benefits our society. The future money that an educated society will bring, outweighs expenditures tenfold.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Not when it takes away from the education that children who are here legally are receiving. I don't blame the children who don't speak any English. I blame their parents. There are free classes to learn English and most don't use them. They expect us to learn their language. They expect the teachers to teach their children English and in the mean time to say everything in Spanish. It isn't right.

    ReplyDelete
  39. To the anonymous poster at 8:18am. I'm confused. Our state representatives our democrats.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Anonymous blob at 8:18 How far left can you get? Did you send your response to any dems? I didn’t think so, if you intend on being one way then be one way somewhere else. We are not 50th in per student spending we are in the 20s. The middle of the road but we have one of the highest drop out rate. The next time you spout off stats at least be close.


    As for Anonymous blog at 8:24 you are right we have to teach all kids but we don't have to do it in anything other than English.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Anonymous at 9:28, know your facts. The most recentstatistics show we are now 50th. California hasn't been in the 20's in well over 30 years , so I have no clue what time machine you are using, but you may want to go back and be oblivious. As for being leftist, those who lack knowledge usually resort to name calling, so i will let your comments speak for themselves. Had you read you would know that the reason I e-mailed Republicans because THEY are the ones claiming that our budget issues can be solved with spending cuts. I readily and regularly e-mail Dems and Republicans, but in this case I called Republicans on their comments. I will have no problem calling the Dems on the carpet if they don't follow through on their promises. Don't spoput off unless you know what you are talking about, which you don't. Your comments are sad, and a little pathetic. Poster at 9:24, sorry for the cinfusion. I contacted local state politicians, who happen to be Republicans.Sorry.

    ReplyDelete
  42. "those who lack knowledge usually resort to name calling"

    "Your comments are sad, and a little pathetic."

    I think that speaks for itself.

    And is calling some "left" name calling?

    And no, I'm not the person who you are replying to.

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  43. Comments were called "sad and pathetic", not individuals.

    The individual did call the poster "left"

    Yes your actions do speak for themselves.

    I had to look up the posters
    statements and actually found them to be true. California presently ranks 47th in spending, approx. $2400 below the national average. With the spending cuts in the present budget, California will fall to 50th. Sad.

    Before you people start throwing accusations and getting sensitive, research. It took me 5 minutes to find the facts. All of you can do the same.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Current ranking: 47

    After new budget goes into effect:50.

    Facts suck sometimes, huh?

    ReplyDelete
  45. Mike: Maybe you can post links to your information. That would help out. Just to say I researched it and found it to be true looks like it's "just your opinion". I'm just saying.

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  46. http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20080413/news_1n13pupil.html

    Please read this article and explain to us all how any thing you say has any merit what so ever. You want to talk about name calling (look in a mirror) you want to say my comments are pathetic and sad. It’s amazing when people get so irritated and let there emotions get in the way. It’s a blog and it does not warrant emotion only discussion.

    ReplyDelete
  47. http://www.greatschools.net/cgi-bin/ky/district_profile/200

    Also this one

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  48. Anonymous 11;54am. You have no clue what your talking about. Just what you read on the internet. Cut and paste all you want it proves nothing.

    ReplyDelete
  49. http://www.lao.ca.gov/analysis_2008/education/ed_anl08006.aspx

    sorry the last one was wrong however here is another

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  50. No….. Research and knowledge means nothing. It's funny you spout just words and no substance

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  51. I know it was first mentioned during The Department of Educations State of Education address, which took place on Feb 3, 2009. The data is located on the Department of Ed. Website, even though reporting of budgets doesn't take place for another month officially. It has slowly been getting picked up by other sources. I will put a few in here and you guys can read through them.

    http://www.fox40.com/pages/landing/?Californias-Education-System-Seems-Preca=1&blockID=203440&feedID=190

    http://www.csba.org/NewsAndMedia/Publications/CASchoolNews/2009/Feb/ElectronicOnly/StateOfEd.aspx

    http://www.californiaprogressreport.com/2009/02/state_of_educat_1.html

    The info is relativly new, but it is spreading and people will hear it soon enough.

    People will have to deal with it, Education seems to be top heavy, and I wish cutting at the top would solve everything, but unfortunately it won't. Education is extremely expensive, but Californians really don't understand just how much. People seemed to be so concerned with who said what that we are forgetting the issue. For 2009-2010 school year, California will rank 50th in per pupil spending, almost $2400 below the national average. That is the issue. California has a lot of students which explains why so much money still seems like so little.

    Stop arguing, pointing fingers, whatever. Talk about what we will do to bring California back up to prestige.

    ReplyDelete
  52. The reason the NEA ranks California higher in spending is because the NEA doesn't balnce their numbers with cost of living in certain areas of the us. The cost of living in Detroit, Kentucky, S.Dakota is obviously not as high as in San Fran., L.A., New York, etc... In other words $9000 goes alot farther in S. Dakota, than it does in Southern California.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Anonymous 12:20pm
    At a loss for words and resort to name calling again. bring some facts to the table.

    ReplyDelete
  54. "Research and knowledge mean nothing"

    Interesting opinion.

    ReplyDelete
  55. I get my info from one source and you another. I think we can agree that the school system needs work I don't know if it is money or if it is reform. I do know that there are schools that are as low on the totem pole and have a lower drop out rate. Regardless of what we do we need to do it now.

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  56. To the last poster:

    You Doh E Been Doh.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Since California ranks last in per stundent spending and first in teacher pay, maybe we should bring these closer together?

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  58. What the last poster forgot was that cost of living goes into California pay, along with the fact that the high pay is based on an average. Baby boomer teachers, of which there are alot, may pull down 60 grand, but the vast majority of new and young teachers make significantly less.

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  59. The average compensation for Menifee teachers is over $77,000. There is a lot of people working for a lot less than that.

    Taking into account living expenses, CA teachers still rank at the top in teacher's pay in the Country.

    Besides, I thought the reason they taught was for the kids, not the money.

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  60. Don't be ignorant. There are a significant amount of teachers with years behind them in Menifeehence the 77,000. Teachers don't go into the profession for the money, but that doesn't mean that they should teach for cheap. The medical profession was a profession that at one time people entered into for the public good, not money. Is a doctor worth the money you pay them. If you can do a better job, feel free to quit your Job, and teach your kids at home for free, then tell me teacher's don't earn every penny. If you don't make 77,000 a year, then do what teachers and a substantial amount of other professionals do. Go to college, earn your degrees, and find a job that makes what you think you are worth.

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  61. Teachers make good money and they do disserve what they get. However I feel it is time that all the teachers in the state stop beating on the chest of the tax payers demanding more money. Live within your means and have some pride in your work. It seems that every year I hear that teachers are going to walk off the job if the state or their districts doesn’t give them what they want. YOU HAVE ENOUGH now teach your ass off and make our kids the best in the world. It all up to you.

    ReplyDelete
  62. Anonymous, at March 06, 2009 9:06 AM

    Sorry for the ignorance. The AVERAGE compensation for teachers in the MUSD is $77,680.

    “Teachers don't go into the profession for the money” Why are they always complaining about it then?

    “but that doesn't mean that they should teach for cheap” Why are teacher’s in California so much better than in other states? They are compensated well above the national average after taking into account cost of living.

    “The medical profession was a profession that at one time people entered into for the public good, not money” The key difference between a doctor and a teacher is one is public and one is private.

    “If you don't make 77,000 a year, then do what teachers and a substantial amount of other professionals do. Go to college, earn your degrees, and find a job that makes what you think you are worth.” The problem with paying many teachers that much is we are not getting our money’s worth.

    ReplyDelete
  63. If you want a good homeschooling program go through CALIVA.ORG, this is actually through the State of California and doesn't cost anything. A teacher is assigned who meets with you about once a month to see your childs work. You are provided a computer and all the art, science, social studies and math books and supplies including everything for projects. They also provide all of the reading books according to your childs level. It is actually about a level above what your child would be learning in public school.

    ReplyDelete
  64. Spending has always been a problem with our State Government. They never seem to tax enough. Priority should be Police, Fire, Education, and the balance of the money should be spread among the rest and if there isn't enough money then CUT THE PROGRAMS!

    ReplyDelete

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