Holland Road: Caught Between Rural Legacy, March of Progress

Tom Fuhrman, Menifee city council member and land owner in the affected area, stands in the middle o...

Tom Fuhrman, Menifee city council member and land owner in the affected area, stands in the middle of Holland Road.
Once again, in what has become a theme of the city of Menifee, the new and the old seem stubbornly opposed to one another.

Through the rugged southwestern landscape of a town torn between modern development and rural tranquility runs a country road where potholes are the least of concerns.

To the west, where the route enters Lake Elsinore, what was once a country path for farm vehicles is now a paved roadway, widening from two lanes to four as it approaches the new Canyon Hills housing project and the Herk Bouris Elementary School, which will open its doors in two weeks.

To the east, as the route brings motorists westbound from Murrieta Road, a narrow two-lane paved road shows the signs of progress that has marked Menifee's gradual growth for decades.

Where east meets west is a 1,200-foot stretch of dirt road that runs through the private property of four land owners as it completes this patchwork section of Holland Road. Leaving the pavement in Menifee at the Wooden Nickel Ranch at 25690 Holland Road to the east and wandering like some kind of Old West roller coaster through the dusty peaks and valleys bordering ranch land, it finally reconnects with asphalt on a hill climbing across the Lake Elsinore border.

No, this is certainly not the only place left in Menifee where private dirt roads have become well-traveled links between modern public roadways. It is, howeve